Posts Tagged ‘lunar anomalies’

Strange. I keep subscribing to LunaCognita’s YouTube channel, but it just doesn’t stick for some reason.

In any event, the nearly year-old second video in this thread caught my eye in a thread about it at my hangout, ATS, started by Arken. Being, as many of you know, a fan of LC’s work, I needed to share it with you and wound up including the first video shown here, which is a very recent one.

On this first one, Luna uses the frame stacking technique to bring out the details. For the doubters let me just say that this method is 100% legitimate, is used daily by photographers the world over and works really well. It is very handy and I have used it myself with great results. It is not destructive in the slightest, quite the opposite, actually, it does not add anything that is not already there. Luna adds a touch of contrast is added later here to bring the thingies out just a bit more and that is quite alright considering the condition of the initial frames.

One wonders if the objects are what was intended to be filmed.

I would imagine so, as film stock was a finite commodity.

There are some who might say that these are detritus within the camera or the command module. I’ll just say they certainly don’t seem that way to me.

Uploaded by on Jan 18, 2012

Hi again everyone. This presentation focuses on taking a closer look at a 23.5-second segment of 16mm DAC motion picture footage from the NASA archives that was originally exposed over 40 years ago during the Apollo 12 mission (November 1969). This footage was shot with the DAC camera mounted near a window in the Command/Service Module while the spacecraft was in lunar orbit above the Moon.

Unfortunately, this raw footage, as it is officially archived by NASA, appears to have been over-exposed and accidentally ruined when the lens on the 16mm DAC camera aboard the spacecraft somehow became unintentionally fogged over shortly before filming began. Because of this, this film sequence only affords us a blurry, obfuscated view out the spacecraft window, showing an oblique look at the sunlit (and overexposed) lunar surface with a portion of the lunar limb also visible.

While the raw footage is of poor quality, it does however still contain some viable image data that can be recovered and revealed thru enhancement. The application of various frame-stacking and averaging enhancement techniques can allow us to extract significantly more detail from the scene than the raw archive frames of footage alone appear to surrender. These stack enhancements will allow you to see what appears to be at least three unidentified objects transiting in front of the lunar disc that were actually caught on film here.

Unfortunately, the lack of viable image data and over-exposed nature of the raw footage provides does not allow for a high-detail look at these three distinct contrast targets, so that raises the possibility that one of these moving contrast targets is actually a shadow from one of the unidentified objects above being dropped onto the lurain. The high sun angle that we know was illuminating this scene at the time could certainly allow for that possibility, but would require us to make the unsupported assumption that these unidentified objects are very close to the Moon and are scooting just above the lunar surface.

The reality is that there is simply no way to accurately determine or even estimate any range or size data for these unidentified objects shown. What we can say is that multiple objects can be seen transiting the lunar disc here and can be determined to at the time have been located somewhere in 3-D object space between the camera aboard the CSM spacecraft and the surface of the Moon.

Cheers everyone, and thanks for watching!
LunaCognita

Pretty neat, eh?

I think so.

On to the next one.

The description below pretty much says it all as usual. And as usual the production values are to a very high standard which I appreciate being trained as a filmmaker and all. Wish I could find my old After Effects CD in the rubble of my local environs. Had to put in a new C drive array, needs to go back in. Luna’s films always stoke that urge in me and I do actually have a very interesting sequence of still images that are just itching to be a joined together as a movie. The depression always gets in the way, though. Always. Oh, man, I hope they’re not on the dead Glyph, as I can’t afford to send it out for repair and naturally it’s a stripe so the data on it is in cosmic hands. Sigh.

Good gracious, how did that off topic rant get in here? Didn’t derail things too badly, methinks.

Respected realist Phage, who I like a lot, was saying, among others, that some of the irregularly shaped objects you will see are the aforementioned detritus and anomalies with the film or processing or scanning. Maybe some are. Maybe not. I have seen such flaws on many images. Many are quite obvious and some scanner dust artifacts can look pretty strange. Some of them here at the least I would say are surely not flaws.

Man, I haven‘t pored over “originals” in so long and now don’t have much time to do it anyway, but, I finally got a nice big tiff of the image with the notorious Shard on it yesterday. As is so typical, however, I’ve not even opened it yet. But at least I have it. Always wanted it. Go me.

Anyway, I could go on and on like that for ages, so to spare you from further horror I will say here you go…

Uploaded by on Mar 11, 2011

This presentation is a simple compilation of some more anomalous photographs and 16mm DAC film footage that I have archived during my years of research and investigation looking into the activities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

The images and footage shown here were taken during the Apollo program, filmed by the astronaut flight crews during their journeys to and from the Moon.

Most of what I show here involves “lunar transients” – unidentified objects in space that were captured on film as they transited in front of (or passed near) a celestial body such as the Moon or Earth. I believe many of these objects are not on the lunar surface, but rather were above the lunar surface when captured on film.

I also include several examples of NASA image obfuscation as well, just to help highlight the fact that the space agency also removes anomalous objects from frame in order to “sanitize” scenes prior to official archive release so as to ensure they do not reveal too much of the truth about what is really up there.

Hope you enjoy!
Cheers,
LC

Here are a few links to the last set of images I show, dealing with the detection of cropping obfuscation being employed to sanitize the scenes.
NASA “Gateway” archive link to frame#AS11-36-5319 – shows object off the Earth’s limb.
http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/scripts/sseop/photo.pl?mission=AS11&roll=36&f…

NASA “LPI” archive version of #AS11-36-5319 that does not show the object (residue of the cropping is detectable under enhancement)
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/apollo/images/print/AS11/36/5319.jpg

Cropping proof – second last image shown (AS16-118-18873).
ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/miscellaneous/planetary/apollo/a16_h_118_18873.tiff

Cropping proof – Last image shown (AS13-60-8588).
ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/miscellaneous/planetary/apollo/a13_h_60_8588.tiff

Thanks, Cary, well done, man, well done.

Peace.

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Will try to write more and sidestep the depression a bit, but until then… this quickie post will have to do. It presents WATT friend and reader (!) LunaCognita’s latest film, an unprecedented proper look at the footage of the lift off of the Lunar Module from the end of the Apollo 11 mission. He pretty much explains what’s what with it below, but, do note that near to and again at the end of this clip there are two unidentified objects seen landing

and they both land…

in the very same spot!

WAAAH!

LunaCognita | December 31, 2010

This presentation shows the 16mm Data Acquisition Camera (DAC) footage that was shot during the Apollo 11 ascent from Tranquility Base. In this ascent footage, the DAC motion picture camera was mounted in the right side forward-facing (LMP) window of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module “Eagle”, providing us a view looking down at the Moon’s surface as the LM ascent stage fires and sends the spacecraft on its way back up to lunar orbit for rendezvous and docking with the CSM “Columbia”.

Rather than just showing the raw footage here as it is cataloged in the NASA film archives, I instead show the footage in a rotation-corrected format in order to always keep the scene in it’s proper “horizon up” viewing orientation throughout the duration of the clip. This proper “horizon up” perspective can be established based on some simple visual criteria, with the goal being to ensure we are viewing the footage with the lunar surface being shown so that the Moon’s horizon that is closest to the camera’s current principle point always remains aligned and level towards the top of the field-of-view (even if the horizon itself is not actually visible at the time). This ensures that the surface scene you are viewing can be accurately interpreted.

As you can see in this footage, the rotation correction to align the scene to the “horizon up” viewing perspective is an absolutely vital adjustment that must be applied first in order to be able to even begin attempting to analyze and interpret scenes such as this one accurately. Because the DAC camera was hard-mounted in the window of the LM during liftoff from the lunar surface, this meant that the standard locked display perspective that NASA provides in their archive clips showing the Apollo ascent footage is ALWAYS displaying the lunar surface scene below in an inaccurate perspective. For over 40 years, the public has actually been watching ascent footage like this from the various Apollo missions where the lunar surface after liftoff is being shown essentially upside down (between 135 to 180 degrees off of the “horizon up” viewing perspective).

The point to this simple presentation is to merely serve as a reminder to everyone who is interested in doing their own analysis of ANY of the Apollo DAC footage or still frames of the lunar surface to always consider the question of “what is the proper viewing perspective for each scene?” The ugly fact is that the vast majority of the Apollo DAC footage and still frames, as they are archived by NASA, are not presenting their lunar surface scenes to you in anything close to the proper “horizon up” viewing orientation that our eyes expect to see. Obviously, unless this improper viewing perspective is corrected for first, you have very little chance of being able to analyze the scenes you are looking at with any degree of accuracy at all.

In addition to the rotation-correction, I also was forced to make several frame-rate adjustments to this Apollo 11 DAC footage, and the reason for that is because just before the four-minute mark after liftoff, the 16mm DAC camera suddenly alters it frame exposure rate, switching from 12 frames-per-second (the proper declared setting for filming the liftoff and ascent) down to 6 fps. I have no idea how or why this sudden frame-rate setting change occurs, because adjusting the DAC camera’s fps setting “on the fly” was certainly not one of LMP Buzz Aldrin’s checklisted duties during ascent, and I see no mention in the Apollo 11 mission and post-mission reports to account for this anomalous occurrence. The Apollo 11 ascent footage, as it is archived by NASA, makes no attempt to correct for (or even draw attention to) this sudden step-down in frame-rate, which results in the raw archive footage appearing to suddenly show a doubling of the playback speed. In addition to this, NASA typically renders their HD digital DAC archive at 29.97 NSTC, resulting in further interpolation stretching being introduced in the digital footage. I have attempted to correct for this effect here in order to ensure that the playback rate of the DAC footage accurately matches the accurate timeframe that I was able to establish using the accompanying raw mission audio track and flown liftoff&ascent charts – essentially using the accurate audio timeline to re-synchronize the inaccurate video playback rate so they match up correctly for the duration of the nearly 10-minute complete sequence of footage showing the Apollo 11 ascent from Tranquility Base.
http://magic-ufo.forum-phpbb.in/t871-…
Cheers everyone,
LC

If you’d like to check it out, there is a nice discussion of this work going on over at ATS. Short so far and very well reasoned.

eeasynow — May 12, 2010 — TSIOLKOVSKY’S SECRET http://www.boomslanger.com/apollo15.htm http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_f…

I have seen this footage before and thought it most interesting. Featured from the beginning for a good while is the crater Tsiolkovsky, a geologically “young” crater that has inspired many for a long time.

This video is Apollo 17 Lunar Farside by Easynow of Pegasus and ATS.

There are a couple of researchers, including the inimitable John Lear, who feel strongly that that admittedly interesting mountain in the center(ish) of this crater, is in reality none other than the dirt-covered and parked tow vehicle that the Old Ones used when they put dear Luna in her place. Luna in this scenario is our Moon… as described in the reasonably popular Moon as an artificial body theory.

Apparently this occurred around 10 or 12,000 years ago. Many ancient cultures have accounts from a time when there was no Moon in the sky.

Thing is, though, that a lot of the natural processes on Earth are based on what the Moon’s up to; and those processes have to have taken quite a long time to get going and then develop, surely a lot longer than 12,000 years.

So, unless that “common knowledge” is somehow terribly wrong, how could there have been no Moon? But then again, a lot of respect and heed should be, I feel, given to the accounts of the ancients.

But, hey, dogma be damned, right? Yeah, that’s the spirit!

There are an amazing amount of strange things going on with the moon. Rare is the place that has even a tenth the number of oddities associated with it as our nearest neighbor.

I’m not at all sure what, but something… something… is just not quite right with our Moon. And there is a seriously strong desire in my heart to find out just what that something is.

Those two links up there are a great place to start if you want to dig into the Moon… that regolith’s good stuff!

Well, it’s three in the morning, I have no idea where my wallet is and a fear’s welling up something fierce… more coffee maybe, some comfort food maybe… oh, man… wherewhere?!

Apollo 17 Lunar Farside

The Thing On The Moon by iggymak

Ah, yes, well, here we have the lovely Luz along with righteous dude Darren both modeling variations of my Thing On The Moon Tshirt, which celebrates what may just be the strangest thing that I have ever clapped eyes on — namely, well, the “thing” — discovered back in the day by none other than the notorious Mr. John Lear.

It’s on a photo taken on the exceptionally notorious far side of the Moon… by the intrepid crew of Apollo 8.

A high resolution version, that is; obtained by Lear from his buds a bit before they got real strict about taking stuff like that out of circulation. Score!

This design is my enhancement of a crop of this particular anomaly from that very high res version.

If you’re motivated, the official NASA image number is AS8-12-2209.

High Strangeness at it’s best, eh?!

I mean… seriously… people… wtf is that?!

Yes, indeed… just what in the hell was down there?

I’d really, seriously, like to know…

Was just catching up on my reading over at SHTF411.com by checking out Ocker’s latest post called NASA’s Images and strange Lunar anomalies which presents the nice little video he just made and thought I’d share an extract from a reply therein made by the tireless Pegasus Research Consortium researcher known only as Exuberant1 which I think should, by rights, set off at least a few curiosity triggers in my reader’s heads… because Lunar (not to mention all the other bodies out there) anomaly research needs all the warriors we can muster, after all. And don’t worry, there are more than enough of them to go around.

There’s a lot to be gleaned by careful reading of the transcripts of the astronaut’s conversations during the missions, and the different copies of them, and listening to the recordings… (those that have been released, anyway), for insight into some of the things that went on up there. As you’ll see below, there are spots within them that can really set off one’s imagination.

So here ya go… dig it, droogies…

An Apollo astronaut can hardly believe it….

Sometimes the astronauts got disturbed and they just didn’t want to look down at the moon at all….

It turns out that there is so much stuff on the moon, that it is enough make a man’s head hurt:

(John Young, Apollo 16)

He wouldn’t look. There was too much he didn’t understand…

..And it had nothing to do with the albedo or sunlight.

What could possibly be down there that that would make one of our Finest not want to look at it, what did he not want to see?!

What did he not even want his friend Charlie to see? What the hell was down there?!

Perhaps it had something to do with “them”:

“Just keep on the book”

“That’s why I’m purging the fuel cell”

-Charlie already knows, and that is why he is busying himself…

So again, I ask you… just what in the hell was down there?

Madonne! Oh, man, is this good, folks… wicked good, even. Yes, dear readers, once again LunaCognita has managed to knock my socks right off with this video. Needless to say, I can hardly wait for the full version… because there are objects filmed here that I’ve not seen before, and they are spectacular. Where in the heck does LC find this stuff?

I imagine they’ve been ordered from the NASA archives, but how does one know which ones to buy? Connections within the Pegasus Research crew certainly help in that regard, but still… Oh, and, we mustn’t forget that most of the film that was shot hasn’t been released, still, as far as I am aware… oh how we’d all love to see those.

There is so much material at NASA that is classified… one wonders, if there’s nothing of interest up there besides a bunch of cool minerals… then why is there a need for assigning classified status to images, film and research documents at all? Hmmm?

This film can give some insight into that conundrum.

Amusing it is how the trolls and troglodytes commenting at YouTube call this ice and junk falling off the command and LEM modules. Too funny. Junk? Right, we build such fragile craft… Ice? Umm, this is the Moon, dude… Jeez!

Enjoy the mystery…

Hi everyone,
This brief presentation you will see here is just a bit of a teaser/trailer, showing a short segment from a larger video project I am currently in the process of working on. While the full presentation is still awhile away from being complete, I have received more than a few emails asking me about when my next video was going to come out, so I thought that in the interim, I would release this short segment just as a teaser to show a taste of some of the interesting visuals I plan to include in upcoming presentations where I will provide my own analysis of some of the Apollo-era films. All of the footage you will see here was captured on film during the Apollo missions to the Moon, shot by NASA astronauts. Originally exposed on 16mm film, this footage was taken using what was known as the “DAC” – the “Data Acquisition Camera”.Hope you enjoy,
Cheers!
LunaCognita

THE “DAC”
The Maurer “DAC” cameras used to shoot this footage were modified variable frame rate 16mm motion picture film cameras that were used by the various Apollo crews throughout their missions to the Moon to film scenes of interest through the windows of the spacecraft, as well as to shoot exterior footage during lunar surface “moonwalk” operations and Trans-Earth-Coast EVA ops in cis-lunar space during that return-to-Earth phase of the missions.

When it was being used in “automatic” mode, the DAC camera could be set by the astronaut to expose the film within it’s magazine at one of three set frame-rates – 1, 6 or 12 frames-per-second. In the 1 fps mode, the DAC also could be (and occasionally was) used as a still picture camera to shoot single frames of film.

When placed in “semi-automatic” mode, the DAC camera also offered a 24 fps filming capability, although that mode was used somewhat sparingly during the Apollo program as it only allowed for a maximum 3.7 minutes of run time before a film magazine change was required. More typically, one of the three different “auto” modes were used in order to take advantage of the frame-rate control capability to optimize film usage. These slower frame rate settings of course means that when filming in one of those modes, the DAC was functioning more as a sequential still camera rather than a true 24fps motion picture camera (I realize all motion picture film cameras are essentially stop-motion sequential still cameras, so I am referring to the frame-rate playback issues here). The DAC camera could be used as a hand-held movie camera or it could be hard-mounted to various points inside or outside the spacecraft (or to the LRV or the MET during lunar surface ops) in order to provide a stable platform and hands-free filming capability.

LunaCognita
January 20, 2010

YouTube commenter VideoGearHead said… (I thought this was nice…)

1:38 WTF?!!
1:48 busted-up glass dome?
2:21 fractured moon?
Wowa!

5 million stars!

One more thing…and this frosts my jaw the most…I watched the missions to the moon. I remember when I was in the Boy Scouts spending two bucks to have my name put on the Voyager craft. I remember waiting in anticipation to see really cool pictures of our own solar system – Saturn etc. – and remembering them not being what I expected and having to wait YEARS to see them.

Thank YOU for your vision!

The "Crater" Moltke

Spotted by easynow at ATS, this new videoclip by LunaCognita is pretty wonderful.

Okay… first, though… stare awhile at and contemplate the above image. It’s an image of the “crater” called Moltke, from the Navy space program, i.e. the real one, (Shhh!!!) from the Clementine craft, specifically. Not one of the high-res ones, but hey, it serves the purpose for here I think. Yes, it is blue. Yes, that’s the right color. Glowing, even. Pretty flat. With at least three buildings.

And… roads!

Roads?! Whaddaya mean, roads? Says who? Some nutjob tinfoil blogger dork?

Nope.

Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Mike Collins. Note that the roads are described as being triangular. Triangular? Triangular? Yeah. That’s what he said… Triangular roads.

I’m still attempting to visualize just what, exactly, that characterization means… all the scenes I’m coming up with are pretty rad, but I just know that ‘paling in comparison’ to what these dudes clapped eyes on is the ultimate understatement.

It would, of course, be most helpful – to everyone – if the Powers That Be would simply let Mike Collins tell us what he saw, but as will become tragically clear to you from watching the video, that just ‘ain’t gonna happen’ in our lifetime… unless we… well… I’ll leave that to your imagination.

I’m hoping part 2 comes along soonest. :)

Okay… After you watch the video and are suitably filled with that sense of Whoa!, scroll back up and gaze into the depths of the picture of Moltke “crater” again.

Edit-add: You can download the audio clips for the mission. This particular one is here and the comments in question are about 2/3 of the way in.

In this examination into NASA’s “black box” transcripts, we will look at just a few of the many interesting and revealing comments made by the astronauts throughout the Apollo program that were captured by the CSM’s DSE system, as well as touch on some of the scripting protocols employed during the various TV broadcasts made from the CSM during the journey to and from the Moon and while in lunar orbit. Contrary to what many think, those TV broadcasts were in fact elegantly scripted affairs, designed to rigidly control the amount of data that we, the general public, would have available to analyze. Because of this, the DSE and DSEA internal crew conversation transcripts can provide us, in the astronauts own words, an unscripted and less-guarded insight into some of the incredible things they really witnessed during their journey to and from the Moon.

During the Apollo lunar landing program, NASA made use of two primary flight telemetry/voice recording systems aboard their spacecraft. One of these systems was inside the Command/Service Module, and the other was mounted within the Lunar Module. These two systems were known as the DSE (aboard the CSM) and the DSEA (aboard the LM). The “Data Storage Equipment” systems essentially served as Black Box cockpit voice recorders, designed to tape some of the internal conversations between the astronauts while they were out of radio contact with Mission Control in Houston. After contact was re-established during the flight, Mission Control could then dump (downlink) the recorded data from the CSM to Earth, where it would be analyzed.

Unfortunately, NASA today claims that the original DSE Black Box tapes from the Apollo missions are missing and are presumed lost. However, these DSE recordings were transcribed shortly after the contents of the tapes were originally dumped from the CSM to the Earth, and several years after the Apollo program ended, these transcripts finally were declassified and then released to the NASA archives.

In coming segments, we will examine many more impressive statements made by the NASA astronauts that were captured by the various cockpit voice recording systems utilized during not only the Apollo program, but during the earlier Gemini Earth-orbital flights as well. There is much more to come!

Cheers,
LunaCognita

All the transcript pages shown in this presentation are official source documents, the online versions of which can be accessed @
http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/history/missi…

Enjoy. Oh, hey, this is the 100th post. Cool.

AS16-116-18603HR 'group crop'

Sticking with the lunar theme, here we have a crop from a moon photo, AS16-116-18603, taken by the crew of Apollo 16. The original, as released, can be found at a couple of places, though the Apollo Archive has the cleanest one. There are a couple of other pictures of this spot as well. Inspiration to do some personal exploration into these photos was provided by Keith Laney via his page on this image entitled Apollo Digs #2.

Above we see a crop of the main grouping of strange objects in this apparent junkpile on the surface. The astronauts, Commander John W. Young and Lunar Module Pilot Charles M. Duke Jr., made it a point to get a few shots of this scene and they took one of an intrepid explorer posing nicely alongside it, digging into the ground for samples. Apparent is what seems to be a pile of half-buried and lightly encrusted hardware; a slab sticking upright at a jaunty angle, a flared cylinder just beyond it, to its right a solid cylindrical shaft and a few smaller suspicious objects closer to the camera to boot… hmmm.

This image puts a serious stretch to the believability band regarding the remote possibility that these objects could have come to be eroded into these shapes… and all together like this… via a natural course of events.

The one right below is shaped very, very much like a support base, or perhaps a shelf extension to a desk, complete with a reinforcing bar and stand on its underside. Note the nicely radiused corner. Note that although sturdy it’s not that thick and said thickness is uniform. The support bar/stand assembly is pretty heavy duty, good for holding up something reasonably weighty. I wonder if they took this thing back with them. I certainly would have.

AS16-116-18603HR 'flat tray piece'

Below is item two in the series, just to the right of our slab above, a cylindrical shape of robust thickness and uniformity with a well defined lip and what looks like a circular depression at the center of the interior surface. What appear as gear-like teeth can be seen along the rim. A couple of small “rocks” in front of it are mighty gear-looking as well. Could this really be erosion, or pareidolia? How? Tell me!

The Astronauts were obviously most intrigued by these objects – and they were right there – up close and personal. And being deadly serious military men I imagine they truly didn’t have either the time or the inclination to mess about.

So, here they be. Make of them what you will…

AS16-116-18603HR 'round shaft'

Copernican Mines, Ltd.Remember my post a while ago that featured the aerial shot of the headquarters of the Copernican Mining Company, Limited at the center of the lunar crater Copernicus?

The late Dr. Peter Beter, a strange man who supported the likes of George Wallace, espoused “Christianity” and hated Russia; and to his credit, had the insight to realize and detest the evil of the Rockefellers. Eliminating the threat to the world of the latter was perhaps his main goal in life. Too bad he didn’t succeed. Anyway…

According to the highly opinionated Dr. Beter, this isn’t a photo of Copernican Mining at all… no, this is apparently a photo of a top secret United States military moon base facility; and not only that – it was “taken out of action” by the Russians, with a particle beam weapon, in a terrible battle called “Harvest Moon!” 

I still think it’s Copernican Mining, as there are a hell of a lot of documents supporting the reality of moon (and Mars) mining operations out there, run by the military, of course. It does bear a remarkable similarity to the surface configurations of Earth based underground mining facilities, after all, but it’s still interesting to hear Beter’s opinions on this… and who knows… since he did apparently garner at least some respect from the Powers That Be, he could’ve been on to something. So, for your enjoyment, here’s an excerpt from Beter’s Audioletter 28 of November 21, 1977…

[…] When I recorded Audioletter No. 27 last month, Soviet cosmonauts had established an initial base of operations in Jules Verne Crater on the back side of the moon. However, it was expected at that time that after preliminary preparations they would very shortly be moving both equipment and personnel to the near side, setting up an operational Particle Beam weapon almost immediately when they did so. On October 30, the day after I recorded my tape, I was informed that an initial move to the front side had taken place to Gibbs Crater, which is on the southeast rim of the near side of the moon. Since that time, Soviet activity on the moon has been steadily increasing. As of now there are seven (7) Soviet Particle Beam weapons dotted around the near side of the moon and, surprisingly, there are three separate back-up bases on the far side, including the original site at Jules Verne Crater. As yet, all of these installations are very thinly manned and they are far from being self-sufficient at this point–in order to keep functioning they must periodically receive supplies from earth. But the Particle Beam weapons are operational, and if the normal Soviet pattern is followed, we can expect a test of a moon-based Particle Beam weapon against some earth target in the very near future–and if this is done, it will probably take place under circumstances where its effects can be explained away as having some other cause. Possibly for the sake of secrecy, a target area within the Soviet Union far from populated areas, will be chosen for such testing; but it’s also possible that like the first operational test of an orbital Particle Beam weapon, the first test of a Lunar Particle Beam weapon might be against some target that the Soviet Union wishes to destroy.

In any case, here are the lunar navigational coordinates of
the seven Particle Beam weapons currently on the near side of the moon: No. 1 east of the Sea of Cold at 55 degrees 54 minutes
north, 51 degrees zero minutes east; No. 2 west of the Sea of Crises at 16 – 33 North, 48 – 51 east; No. 3 southeast of the Sea of Fertility at 31 – 53 south, 73 – 9 east; No. 4 near the south pole on the southwest side at 72 – 26 south, 67 – 30 west; No. 5 near Phocylides Crater in the southwest quadrant at 50 – 53 south, 57 – 49 west; No. 6 southwest of the Ocean of Storms at 9 – 26 south, 66 – 52 west; and No. 7 northeast of the Apollo 14 landing site near the center of the near side of the moon at 1 – 23 south, 12 – 27 west. The back-up locations on the far side of the moon are at: No. 1, Jules Verne Crater roughly 36 degrees south, 147 degrees east; No. 2 southeast of Pasture Crater at 13 – 36 south, 108 – 26 east; No. 3 southwest of Compton Crater at 51 – 3 north, 95 – 0 east. […] Read it all here

Apollo 17, Hasselblad magazine 135, image AS17-135-20680, enhanced and web optimized by Iggy Makarevich.

Here’s the original image.

This shot’s quite famous, too, perhaps more so than the glowing green critter lurking in the deep boulder shadow from a few posts ago. This is Apollo 17 image catalog number AS17-135-20680.

When you look at the original, at first glance you might even throw it away as it’s overexposed greatly. Still though, a second glance reveals a faint form in the center… just enough to cry out to the viewer to try to bring it out. It looks as though there might be a pyramid there. 

And, lordy, as you see above… there is!

Nicely shaped, too, no? I’ve enhanced this a few times over the years and this one turned out the best I think. Those of little imagination claim we’re all nuts and  it’s just a pic of the floor of the car, as the NASA catalog lists it as:

AS17-135-20680 (OF300) ( 209k or 1402k )

LRV Floor? Sunstruck.

That’s only because the previous two shots actually were shots of the floor of the rover. The two before that are shots of the rover’s seats. What the brain-challenged skeptoids disregard is that question mark you see there. They’re good at that. And it is obviously pretty well sunstruck. But not well enough, thank the deities.

Too bad they didn’t hang about, but they had other tasks. The primary mission of Apollo 17, unlike the blather released to the people who paid for all this, i.e. you and me, now seems to have been the clandestine investigation of a feature called Nansen, an apparent opening into the rather geometrically shaped massif that is a good candidate for a structure.

Upon landing on December 19, 1972, they immediately went all out to get there. Went right to it. Fast. When they got there they went to great lengths to hide what they were doing and position cameras so we couldn’t see. So even Houston couldn’t see. Anything. They did get lots of Hasselblad shots down there in that alien hole, though. How many were released, you ask? You guessed it. None. To this day. You should learn about this mission. It’s pretty exciting stuff. For further enlightenment, thankfully Mr. Keith Laney has written a wonderful series on the whole escapade that you simply must read if lunar anomalies are your thing.

Update: There’s a video on YouTube that stars this image. It’s very good, too!

Apollo 17 image AS17-137-20925HR; enhanced gamma, brightness and contrast.

This is a crop of the somewhat notorious Apollo 17 image AS17-137-20925HR. Why notorious? It’s that green thing. Some have been so bold as to suggest it’s some sort of lifeform. Since this is the moon, I’m not too sure about that conjecture… Although it has been shown that the moon has an atmosphere and water ice, there doesn’t appear to be a heck of a lot of water around this locale. Be that as it may… there this thing is. Note that it is not at all required to do any enhancing to the original photo in order to see our green friend. Nope, it stands right out… in a pretty deep shadow no less. As if it’s actually self-luminous. High strangeness, indeed.

An unknown form of living thing is a bit more likely than some sort of alien device doing who knows what…

For the image here, I started with a version with enhanced gamma, although I don’t remember where I got it. (I have such a backlog of these things to write about… sheesh.). I elevated the brightness and contrast by 30 each to get the lighting up to snuff and approach daylight a bit. [No pixels were harmed in the making of this picture.]

Nice purple mineral it’s sitting on, by the way. Food, maybe? Like the NY Lottery ads say, “Hey, you never know.” Life out there doesn’t necessarily have to follow our dogma. If you said 50 years ago that there were creatures on Earth that live 2 miles down and eat rocks, you know what would’ve happened, right? Right.

It would be so sad if the anomaly is a film defect, but of course it could be, can’t leave that out no matter how doubtful the scenario, the film being custom made expressly for the lunar program. Nothing remotely like it has appeared before or since.

So… being the romantic nut that I am, I vote for… High Strangeness.

Update 5/20/09: added image below. For this version, only brightness was applied to the original hi-res image as released to the public. This is to better show you the very interesting colors at the tip of this object and what may well be projections in the tip area.

AS17-137-20925HR with only brightness applied.

From Russia's Luna13 probe, which landed on December 24, 1966, an artifact.

I saw this last night as a post by Mikesingh at the ATS site, who is one of the good guys there. I usually scan and only sometimes visit longer on the site, as I find the preponderance of professional debunkers who lurk there like so many cockroaches in the crannies most annoying. This time was good though as this post caught my eye

Interesting because the images presented are not from the master of lies and obfuscations, but from Russia 40 plus years ago.

Interesting comment thread, as usual… I must say I wonder about some of those folks. Quite a few think it’s a piece of the lander, a piece of its antenna, claiming that Russians built only junk that fell apart. That’s well beyond patently ludicrous. Just how frakken stupid can people be?

These people were the first to land on the moon, the first to get pictures as well as the last to land on the moon. Let’s not forget Mars and Venus, either. 

If, as most claim, it’s part of the antenna, which it clearly is not if one merely hazards a peek at the spacecraft, and then at the piece, repeating as often as necessary ’till it sinks in, then, how the hell was it transmitting the images? Huh? Huh? Sorry, I’ve been at this too long to abide utter asininity and I’m just sick of it. Sorry. Seriously. It’s not on. 

I’m okay now. I don’t know what this thing is, but it ain’t no part o’ that machine.

The image above is a crop I did off the second panorama, which has a number of other interesting things in it as well as this piece.

And ladies and gentlemen, to our left just below is the headquarters of Copernican Mining Co., Ltd., that looney lunar leader in processing titanium and fine minerals… (ahem) yes… this was snapped in 1967 by the Lunar Orbiter 5 probe as it soared high over the magnificent crater Copernicus.

Via a link in the Fortean Phenomena Again group, this info was revealed to me… it’s at the Paranormal News site – via a reader’s email, which included the above video and a few photos, one of which is below.

It’s yet another strangely suspicious-looking structure on the lunar surface, complete with a totally different albedo than the surrounding area and a nice assortment of reasonably intricate geometric forms within its confines. None of which suggest geology, of course.

So, what do you think? Heap o’ rocks? Trick of light and shadow? Maybe something else? You can tell what I’m thinking by this post’s very existence, but why not download the image for yourself and blow it up a bit… just for fun. 

From the video’s info block:
What do you think ? How would NASA explain this ?

Official image :
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/lun…
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/lun… (5151_h1)

Eastern Oceanus Procellarum, Mare Insularum, Copernicus Crater / (~) 9.3° N, 19.25° W

Music : Nada Surf – Where is my mind (Pixies Tribute)

If someone can help for the structure’s scale…

Copernican Mines, Ltd.